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Chapter 1
How To Erect A Horoscope
IN erecting a horoscope there are simple problems of two separate kinds. The first set
of problems maps the positions of the signs of the zodiac in relation to the earth. The
second set of problems maps the positions of the various planets in relation to the
zodiacal signs.
These problems are quite distinct from each other because the positions of the
zodiacal signs are calculated from Sidereal Time, while the positions of the planets
are calculated from Equivalent Greenwich Mean Time. Most of the trouble
experienced by beginners arises from failing to remember that the kind of time used
for mapping the zodiacal signs is not the same as the time used for mapping the
planets.
Both the Sidereal Time of Birth and the Equivalent Greenwich Mean Time of Birth
are derived from still a third kind of time, called Local Mean Time. Because it is
necessary first to find the Local Mean Time before either of the other kinds of time
can be ascertained, and therefore before either sign positions or planet positions can
be computed, I call the Local Mean Time the DOMINANT FACTOR.
From this Dominant Factor, or Local Mean Time, the Sidereal Time of Birth is
calculated. Because this Sidereal Time of Birth is the key to the positions of the
zodiacal signs, I call Finding the Sidereal Time of Birth the FIRST KEY
PROBLEM.
From this Dominant Factor, or Local Mean Time, the Equivalent Greenwich Mean
Time Interval is calculated. Because this Equivalent Greenwich Mean Time Interval
is the key to the positions of the planets, I call Finding the Equivalent Greenwich
Mean Time Interval of Birth the SECOND KEY PROBLEM.
Yet before attempting the actual work of erecting a horoscope the student should
know what a horoscope is, what data is required to erect it, the meaning of the
symbols commonly employed, and how to add and subtract both Longitude and
Time. These can be conveniently handled as PRELIMINARY EXPLANATIONS.
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It should now be clear that erecting a horoscope divides itself according to the natural
sequence of the work into four well marked divisions that are based upon)
PRELIMINARY EXPLANATIONS, DOMINANT FACTOR. FIRST KEY
PROBLEM,
and SECOND KEY PROBLEM.
In the complete work there are eleven separate processes or steps. When you become
accustomed to them some of these steps will be passed over so rapidly as hardly to be
noticed; yet unless short cuts are used these eleven steps are always taken in the
erection of a complete horoscope.
The time for which the chart is erected may be before noon or it may be after noon, the
place may be east, or it may be west, of a standard meridian, or there may be other
variations. In this one lesson I have taken into consideration all the various
conditions and circumstances an astrologer is apt to meet, and have formulated rules
and given examples having reference to them all. You will find twenty-seven rules.
So many rules, and the examples illustrating them, may give you the impression that
erecting a horoscope is a formidable task. Yet as a matter of fact, in the erection of
any one chart only a part of the rules are used. Even the following of the eleven
necessary steps quickly becomes almost automatic, and you will soon do most of the
calculations mentally about as quickly as you can conveniently enter the results in
the map.
Instead of being a complicated task, all that is really necessary to erect a horoscope is
the knowledge that the signs are placed in the map from the Sidereal Time of Birth,
that the planets are placed in the map from Equivalent Greenwich Mean Time
Interval of Birth, that both of these different times are computed from the Local
Mean Time of Birth, and the use of addition, subtraction, and common sense.
PRELIMINARY EXPLANATIONS
The word horoscope is derived from Greek words meaning hour view. It is a map of
the heavens showing the positions of the planets and zodiacal signs as viewed from
some particular place at some particular time. There are, therefore, three distinct
factors necessary for the erection of a horoscope of birth of a child or other event:
A--Astronomical data from which the positions of the signs and
planets may be calculated.
B--The place of birth from which the heavens are to be viewed.
C--Time of birth--Year, Month, Day of Month, and Time of
Day, A. M. or P. M.--when the heavens are thus to be viewed.
(A) The necessary astronomical data for calculating the positions of the signs and
planets may be found in an Astronomical Ephemeris for the year of birth.
Astronomical ephemerides commonly cover but a single year each, and may be had
for each year since 1850.
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The data for determining the relation of the heavens to the particular place may be
found by consulting a Table of Houses for the Latitude of the place. A Table of
Houses is good for any year, and need only approximate the latitude of birth.
Raphael's
1
ephemeris contains not only the positions of all the planets for mean
noon, Greenwich, for each day of the year covered, but also contains an aspectarian, a
table of houses for several important places, and a table of proportional logarithms.
(B) The location of the place for which the horoscope is erected may be ascertained
by consulting a common atlas or geography and finding its Latitude and Longitude.
Longitude is expressed in ° (degrees), ' (minutes), and " (seconds) E (east) or W
(west) of Greenwich. Latitude is expressed in °, ', and ", N (north) or S (south) of the
equator. Where unusual precision is required geocentric latitude is used, but the
latitude of the common map is precise enough for all ordinary purposes.
(C) There are various systems for recording time which are or have been in use.
Unless the time used is known, a correct chart cannot be erected. This matter of what
kind of time was used at any given date is of utmost importance, but is so complicated
that it requires a special volume for treatment. Such a volume is published entitled,
World Daylight Saving Time.
As the astronomical data given in the ephemeris is calculated for Mean Time, unless
the time of birth is given in terms of local mean time it becomes necessary to convert
the recorded time into local mean time.
Sample Ephemeris
1
Used at the time of this writing. Other ephemerides work as well as Raphael's, as long as they have
pertinent information such as declinations.
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The use of local mean time requires that every
place having a different longitude should have a
different time. As this is a nuisance, Standard Time
is now used in most parts of the world. In the
United States the country is divided into four
Standard Time Zones each containing 15�
longitude. The Standard Meridian for Eastern
Time is 75°, or 5 hours, west; the Standard
Meridian for Central Time is 90°, or 6 hours, west;
the Standard Meridian for Mountain Time is 105°,
or 7 hours, west; and the Standard Meridian for
Pacific Time is 120°, or 8 hours, west. Eastern
Canada has a further zone, called Atlantic Time,
which is but 4 hours west.
Theoretically, all places 7½° east and 7½° west of
a standard meridian should keep the same time. As
a matter of fact, railroad divisions and natural
boundaries greatly influence the actual place
where time changes are made. Furthermore, the
dividing line where such changes of time take
place has not remained constant, but has shifted
along with railroad changes and the development
of certain regions. The map on at the front of this lesson
(page 2), gives the zones and places of time change
as they exist at the present time. But if a birth is
near these places of time change, much pains
should be exercised to ascertain just what time was
used in recording the birth.
Standard Time was adopted throughout the United
States, theoretically, Nov. 18, 1883, at Noon; and
in Great Britain in 1880. Actually it was not used in
many places until considerably later. Previous to
these dates each place used its own time, the Local
Mean Time. On all dates after the adoption of
Standard Time, when the time given is that of the ordinary watch or clock, it becomes
necessary to convert this standard Time to Local Mean Time.
To still further complicate matters, during and following the great war, daylight
saving time was adopted in many countries. It was in general use in the U. S. during
1918 and 1919, and is still used in some sections of the country. As if this were not
confusion enough, in some towns in the eastern U. S. at the present, there are two
kinds of time in use. Daylight Saving Time has been made legal, but as it so
complicates schedules, the railroads continue to use Standard Time. To get the time
of birth right, inquiry must be made as to which time was used in the record.
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The U. S. used Daylight Saving in 1918 from March 31 to October 27, and in 1919
from March 30 to October 26 but where continued the change date varies. When the
birth is timed by Daylight Saving, it becomes necessary to subtract one hour from the
clock time to get the Standard Time. Then in the usual way, Standard Time may be
converted into Local Mean Time.
Then again, in some countries, notably Russia,
the Julian Calendar was used up to the time of
the Revolution in 1917. Even here there are
exceptions, as some places on the Black Sea
used the calendar of their neighbors. When,
however, the date is given Old Style, as it was
reckoned in Russia, it must be converted into
the Gregorian Calendar, or New Style, because
the ephemeris is calculated New Style. This is
done by adding 12 days to Old Style dates
occurring in the 19th Century, and by adding
13 days to Old Style dates since 1900. Thus,
Jan. 2, 1916, Old Style, is the same as Jan. 15,
1916, New Style. The Horoscope, consequently,
should be erected for Jan. 15.
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How to recognize astronomical symbols, and
the signs that always occur opposite each other.
Table I at the front of this lesson (page 7) gives the names of the zodiacal signs, the symbol
for each sign, the number of each sign in the zodiac (not its vibratory number), and the signs
that are always opposite each other. This table should be thoroughly memorized.
Table II (page 7)gives the names of the planets, the symbol for each planet,
and--with the exception of the Sun which is given first because most important--the
order of their speed through the zodiac, the Moon being fastest in motion. This table
also should be well memorized.
How to add and subtract
Longitude, Right Ascension, Mean
Time and Sidereal Time.
Geographical longitude and celestial right ascension (R.A.)
2
are expressed in °, ', and ".
Zodiacal longitude is expressed in S, °, ', and ".
Table III (see Table page 7) gives the necessary data. It should be memorized.
2
For plotting the positions of fixed stars, which may be far north or south of the zodiac, Right
Ascension is more convenient than zodiacal longitude, and is chiefly used in astronomical works; but
is not employed in erecting a birthchart, nor in progressing the planets.
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Rule 1.
--To add Long. or R.A. Add the ", and if the sum exceeds 60" subtract 60" from it, the
remainder being " and each 60" being called 1' and added to the ' column.
Add the ' including that carried over from the " column and if the sum exceeds 60',
subtract 60' from it, the remainder being ' and each 60' being called 1° and added to
the ° column. Add the °, including that carried over from the ' column, and if the sum
exceeds 360° subtract 360 from it. The remainder being °, and each 360° being called
a circle and discarded.
Example (1). Given Perth, W. Australia, with a long. 115° 54' E. and St. Johns,
Newfoundland, with a long. 52° 42' W to find how far in long. they are apart.
115° 54' 00"
E
+52° 42' 00"
W. to be added.
168° 36' 00"
apart is the Answer
Rule 2.
--To subtract Long. or R.A. Subtract " from ", and if the minuend be too small,
borrow 1' from the ' column, and calling it 60" add to the minuend " column. Subtract
' from ', and if the minuend be too small borrow 1° from the ° column and calling it
60' add to the ' in the minuend. Subtract ° from ° and if the minuend be too small add
the full circle of 360° to the ° in the minuend to make subtraction possible.
Example (2). Traveling in a westerly direction from San Francisco with a long. of
122° 26' W., how far is it in long. to Buenos Aires with a long. of 58° 18' W.?
58° 18' 00"
360°
add degrees in a circle.
418° 18' 00"
equals new minuend.
-122° 26' 00"
subtract
295° 52' 00"
equals the Answer
Mean Time and Sidereal Time are expressed in h (hours). m (minutes), and s
(seconds). Table IV, giving this, should be memorized.
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Rule 3.
--To add Mean Time proceed as in adding long. except that if the total sum exceeds
12h, 12h should be subtracted from it, calling the difference P.M. of the same day if
A.M. was given, or A.M. of the following day if P.M. was given.
Example (3a). Given a mean time of 11h 58m 32s A.M. Jan. 6, to find the mean time
6h 23m 52s later.
11h 58m 32s
A.M. Jan. 6
+6h 23m 52s
add for correction
18h 22m 24s
-12h
subtract
6h 22m 24s
P.M. Jan. 6 is the Answer
Example (3b). Given a mean time of 10h 24m 31s P.M. Jan, 6, to find the mean time
8h 42m 35s later.
10h 24m 31s
P.M. Jan. 6.
+ 8h 42m 35s
add
19h 07m 06s
-12h
subtract
7h 07m 06s
A.M. Jan. 7 is the Answer
Rule 4.
--To subtract Mean Time Proceed as in subtracting long. except that if the
minuend be too small in h, 12h must be added to it, and the difference is then P.M. of
the day before if A.M. time is given, or A.M. of the same day if P.M. time is given.
Example (4a). Given a mean time of 8h 42m 36s A.M. Jan. 6, to find the mean time
10h 38m 56s earlier.
8h 42m 36s
A.M.
+12h
add
20h 42m 36s
-10h 38m 56s
subtract
10h 03m 40s
P.M. Jan. 5 is the Answer
Example (4b). Given a mean time of 7h 37m 22s P.M. Jan. 6, to find the mean time
9h 21m 58s earlier.
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7h 37m 22s
P.M.
+12h
add
19h 37m 22s
- 9h 21m 58s
subtract
10h 15m 24s
A.M. Jan. 6 is the Answer
Rule 5.
--To add or subtract Sidereal Time (S.T.) proceed as with mean time except that
when the sum is in excess of 24h, 24h must be subtracted, the remainder being the
required S.T.; and when the minuend is too small to permit subtraction, 24h must first
be added to it.
Example (5a). Given a S.T. of 19h 24m 29s. to find the S.T. 6h 4m 31s later.
19h 24m 29s
+6h 04m 31s
add
25h 29m 00s
-24h
subtract for correction
1h 29m 00s
Is the Answer
Example (5b). Given a S.T. of 4h 27m 18s, to find the S.T. 5h 41m 28s earlier.
4h 27m 18s
+24h
add
28h 27m 18s
- 5h 41m 28s
subtract
22h 45m 50s
is the Answer
Rule 6.
--To add Zodiacal Longitude proceed as in geographical longitude except that if
the sum exceeds 30°, subtract 30° from it, each 30° being called One Sign and added
to the sign column. If the signs exceed 12, subtract 12S from the sum, being careful to
note that Pisces is both sign 12, and sign 0.
Example (6). Given Pisces (12S) 28° 4' 29". to add 4° 16' 33" to it.
12S 28° 04' 29"
+ 0S 04° 16' 33"
add
13S 02° 21' 02"
12S
subtract
1S 02° 21' 02", or Aries 2° 21' 2" is the Answer
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Rule 7.
--To subtract Zodiacal Longitude proceed as in subtracting geographical
longitude except that if the minuend be too small in S, 12S must be added to it, and if
too small in °, 30° (1S) must be borrowed
from the S column.
Example (7). Given Aries 4° 32' 16", to
subtract 20° 33' 19" from it.
1S 04° 32' 16"
+12S
add
13S 04° 32' 16"
-
20° 33' 19"
subtract
12S 13° 58' 57" or
Pisces 13° 58' 57" is
the Answer
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THE DOMINANT FACTOR
STEP 1. How to Find the Local
Mean Time.
--One complete revolution of the earth on its axis, which is the time between two
successive transits of the sun's semi-diameter across the same meridian, measures 24
hours. In the complete revolution the 360° of geographical longitude measuring the
earth's circumference pass under the sun at meridian. Dividing 360° by 24, gives 15°
that pass under the sun at meridian every hour. Dividing this hour of 60 minutes by 15
gives 4 minutes as the time required for 1° longitude to pass under the sun at
meridian.
Thus in the prevalent method of reckoning, the Standard Meridians of Time, starting
at Greenwich, are exact multiples of 15° E. or W., there being a difference of just 1h
in time between successive Standard Meridians. A glance at the maps at the front
of this lesson (pages 1 and 2), will indicate these various meridians and time zones.
Now if the place for which the chart is to be erected is exactly on one of the Standard
Meridians the Local Mean Time (L.M.T.) is the same as the time recorded by the
clock. But since standard time came into use, if the place is either E. or W. of a
standard meridian, the clock time must be converted into L.M.T.
Clocks west of a Standard Meridian are FAST.
Clocks east of a Standard Meridian are SLOW. And
as 1° longitude is the equivalent of 4m time, as
shown above, the number of ° E. or W. of the
Standard Meridian may be converted into time
merely by multiplying by 4 and calling the result
minutes.
Rule 8.
--When Standard Time is given to find the
L.M.T. at a place west of a Standard Meridian
multiply the ° distant from the standard by 4, calling
the result minutes, multiply the minutes by 4 to get
seconds, and subtract from standard time.
Example (8). Given a standard time at San Francisco of 5h 00m A.M., to find the
L.M.T. San Francisco is 122° W. 26" long. The Pacific Standard Meridian is 120° W.
Difference in long. is 2° 26'.
2° 26' X 4 gives 9 minutes 44 seconds.
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5h 00m 00s A.M.
-9m 44s subtract
4h 50m 16s A.M. L.M.T. is the Answer
Rule 9.
--When Standard Time is given to find the L.M.T. at a place east of a Standard
Meridian
multiply the ° distant from the standard by 4. calling the result minutes, the
minutes by 4 to get seconds, and add to the standard time.
Example (9). Given a standard time at New York of 5h 32m P.M., to find the L.M.T.
New York is 73° W 57' long. The Eastern Standard Meridian is 75° W 00'.
Difference in long. is 1° 3'. 1° 3' X 4 gives 4 minutes 12 seconds.
5h 32m 00s
P.M.
+
4m 12s add
5h 36m 12s
P.M. L.M.T. is the Answer
Line 19 Correction:
Because the earth rotates at a rate of 1° in 4 minutes, the solar day is longer than the
sidereal day by a little less than 4 minutes (3
m
56
s
). A correction of 9.86 secs per hour of
EGMT (3
m
56
s
/ 24
h
= 9.86
s
) must be made.
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FIRST KEY PROBLEM
STEP II. How to Find the Sidereal
Time of Birth.
--The celestial equator is the projection of the earth's equator in the heavens. There
are 360° in the celestial equator. To measure any circle a starting point is necessary.
The starting point for measuring along the earth's equator is the Meridian of
Greenwich. The starting point for measuring along the celestial equator is the point
where the sun crosses it each year moving north in the spring of the year. This point is
the vernal equinox called 0° Aries.
The distance E. or W. of Greenwich as we have seen may be expressed in °, ', and ",
or in h, m, and s. So, likewise, the distance E. or W. of 0° Aries may be expressed in °,
', and ", and so expressed is called Right Ascension (R.A.). Or it may be expressed in
h, m, and s, and then is called Sidereal Time (S.T.). R.A. in the heavens corresponds
to geographical longitude. Sidereal Time is the distance along the celestial equator
from 0° Aries expressed in Time. The S.T. at noon of any day represents the distance
of the point on the celestial equator from 0° Aries that is on the Mid Heaven (M.C.) at
noon of that day.
Knowing the S.T.--distance from 0° Aries in time--on the M.C. at noon, and that the
whole celestial equator must pass the M.C. in 24h, it is easy to calculate the
S.T.--distance from 0° Aries--that is on the M.C. at any moment of that day. The
INTERVAL of time since noon added to the S.T. at noon, or the INTERVAL of time
before noon subtracted from the S.T. at noon, must give the required S.T. This is the
exact distance of the point on the M.C. from 0° Aries.
The Sidereal Time at noon for each day at Greenwich is given in the ephemeris for
the year in which the date occurs.
Rule 10.
--To find the Sidereal Time when the L.M.T. is after noon, consult the ephemeris
for that year and day and to the S.T. there given for noon add the L.M.T., or
INTERVAL after noon. For greater precision see correction below.
Rule 11.
--To find the Sidereal Time when the L.M.T. is before noon, consult the
ephemeris for that year and day and from the S.T. there given for noon subtract the
INTERVAL between the L.M.T. and noon. For greater precision see correction
below.
Correction of Sidereal Time for Precision
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--As Sidereal Time increases at the rate of approximately 4 minutes a day where
precision is required a correction of 9.86s (roughly 10s) per hour must be made both
for longitude from Greenwich, and for the INTERVAL between L.M.T. and noon.
The separate correction for L.M.T. is best performed by always ADDING 9.86s per
hour to the INTERVAL between L.M.T. and
noon. The separate correction for longitude
may best be performed by adding 9.86s
per hour to S.T. if west, and
subtracting 9.86s per hour from S.T.
if east, longitude.
It is easier in actual practice to make
BOTH corrections at one operation
after finding the E.G.M.T.
INTERVAL (Step IV) by adding
9.86s per hour that the INTERVAL
E.G.M.T. is past noon to the S.T., or
subtracting 9.86s per hour that the
INTERVAL E.G.M.T. is before noon from
the S.T. See Chapter 8.
For the sake of clearness of detail the examples here perform the two corrections
separately.
Example (10). Given a L.M.T. of 5h 36m 12s P.M. Jan. 2, 1920, at New York, to find
the Sidereal Time.
5h 36m 12s
L.M.T
+
55s
to correct. interval
5h 37m 07s
+18h 43m 20s S.T. correction (See ephemeris)
24h 20m 27s
+
49s
correction for longitude
24h 21m 16s
- 24h
subtract day
0h 21m 16s
True S.T. is the Answer
Example (11). Given a L.M.T. of 4h 50m 16s A.M. March 4, 1920, at San Francisco,
to find the Sidereal Time.
12h 00m 00s noon any day
-
4h 50m 16s L.M.T., subtract
7h 09m 44s minus interval of time
+
1m 11s to correct interval
7h 10m 55s corrected interval
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22h 47m 47s
S.T. Mar. 4, noon
-
7h 10m 55s subtract int.
15h 36m 52s
+
1m 20s
correction for longitude
15h 38m 12s
True S.T. Answer
HOUSE CUSPS
STEP III. How to Place Signs and
Degrees Upon House Cusps.
--The dividing line between one house and another is called its cusp. The houses are
numbered in example chart No. 1 at the front of this lesson (page 6).
Rule 12.
--In a table of houses for the latitude of birth find in its column the S.T. of birth.
Opposite this time, or its nearest approximate, will be found the sign and degree to be
placed on each house cusp from 10th to 3rd. When these have been entered into the
chart on their appropriate cusps, place the same degree of the opposite sign on the
opposite house cusp. Signs opposite each other are given in Table I.
Example (12) Given a S.T. of Birth at New York of 0h 21m 16s, to place the zodiacal
signs and degrees in the chart.
New York is 40° 43' N. Latitude. Consulting the table of houses for this latitude
given in Raphael's ephemeris I find the nearest S.T. given as 0h 22m 02s. Opposite
this S.T. under column marked 10, I find 6°, and looking up this column I find this to
be of the sign Aries. I therefore place 6° Aries on the cusp of the 10th house in the
chart.
Opposite the same S.T. I find 13° Taurus on the 11th house cusp, 21° Gemini on the
12th house cusp, 23° 24' Cancer on the 1st house cusp, or Ascendant, 13° Leo on the
2nd house cusp, and 6° Virgo on the 3rd house cusp. And I place them thus in the
chart.
For the 4th house cusp I look in Table I of opposite signs and as Libra is always
opposite Aries I use 6° Libra. For the 5th house cusp I use 13° Scorpio, as Scorpio is
opposite Taurus; on the 6th I use 21° Sagittarius because Sagittarius is opposite
Gemini; on the 7th I use 23° 24' Capricorn because Capricorn is opposite Cancer; on
the 8th I use 13° Aquarius because Aquarius is opposite Leo; and on the 9th 1 use 6°
Pisces because Pisces is always opposite Virgo. Example chart No. I has been
corrected by Rule 13.
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Inserting Missing Signs
--Frequently the same sign will be found on more than one house cusp. When this
occurs other signs are missing. These may be found by counting the signs in their
regular order. They should then be entered on
the map in the middle of those houses
where they fall by their natural sequence in the
zodiac.
Tables of houses may be had giving the
house cusp to the nearest tenth of a degree.
Where great precision is required the exact
minute on any house cusp may be found by
the following rule:
Rule 13.
3
--To find the exact ' on any house cusp:
4
Look in a table of houses for the latitude of
birth. Find (a) the difference between the
nearest and the next nearest S.T. of birth.
Find (b) the difference between the True S.T. of birth and the nearest S.T. of birth. Find
(c) the difference between the cusps corresponding to the nearest and the next nearest
S.T. of birth. Then (a): (b) :: (c): ?
Multiply (b) by (c) and divide the product by (a). If the True S.T. of birth is more than
the nearest S.T. add; if less, subtract. Example 13. To find the exact ' on the
Ascendant when the S.T. of birth at New York is 0h 21m 16s.
0h 22m 02s
nearest S.T.
-
18m 21s
next nearest
03m 41s
or 221s (a)
0h 22m 02s
nearest S.T
-
21m 16s
true S.T
0h 00m 46s
(b)
4S 23° 24'
nearest cusp
- 4S 22° 40'
next nearest
0S 00° 44'
(c)
3
See "Chart Erection Short Cuts and Examples" (last chapter in this book) for latitude correction notes.
4
For mapping the character, and the type of events which the thought-cells so mapped tend to attract, a
chart with the nearest degree on the Ascendant and Midheaven is precise enough. But when it is
desired to progress the positions of the chart to determine WHEN energy from a certain planet will be
added to a group of thought-cells in sufficient volume to attract a specific event, it is essential that the
Ascendant and Midheaven, which are treated as planets, should be calculated to the exact minute of
zodiacal longitude.
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To Work a Problem In Proportion
--As the product of the means is equal to the product of the extremes, when the two
inner terms are given multiply one by the other and divide the product by the outer
term. When the two outer terms are given multiply one by the other and divide the
product by the inner term. The result is the answer. Such problems are taught in
grammar school, and are essential to astrological work.
221 (a) :46 (b) ::44 (c): ?
44 X 46 equals 2024
2024 divided by 221 equals 9'
4S 23° 24'
-
9'
subtract
4S 23° 15'
or,Cancer 23° 15' is the Answer
South Latitude
--Tables of houses for north latitude may be used for places in south latitude by
adding 12h to the S.T. and using the degrees thus found, but placing opposite signs on
the house cusps. Detailed examples of this will be found in Chapter 8.
SECOND KEY PROBLEM
PLANETS IN SIGNS
STEP IV. How to Find the
E.G.M.T. INTERVAL
Rule 14.
--To find the difference in time between the place of birth and Greenwich,
multiply the ° distant in longitude from Greenwich by 4, calling the product minutes,
and multiply the ' by 4, calling the product seconds. Convert into hours and minutes.
Example (14). Given a long. of 73° W 57' (New York) to find the difference in time
from Greenwich.
73 X 4 equals 292m. 57 X 4 equals 228s. 292m divided by 60 equals 4h, plus 52m
remainder. 228s divided by 60 equals 3m, plus 48s remainder. 4h 52m plus 3m 48s
equals 4h 55m 48s. Ans.
Rule 15.
--Divide the ° by 15. The quotient is hours, the remainder multiplied by 4 is minutes.
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Example (15). Given a long. of 118¼° (Los Angeles) to find the difference in time
from Greenwich.
118¼ divided by 15 equals 7h. The remainder, 13¼ X 4 equals 53m. 7h 53m, Ans.
Rule 16.
--To find the E.G.M.T. when the place is west of Greenwich, add the difference in
time to the L.M.T., when the place is east of Greenwich subtract the difference in
time from the L.M.T.
Example (16a). Given a L.M.T. of 5h 36m P.M. and a difference in time of 4h 56m
W. (New York), to find the E.G.M.T.
5h 36m
P.M. L.M.T.
+ 4h 56m
add
10h 32m P.M. E.G.M.T. is the Answer
Example (16b). Given a L.M.T. of 10h 02m A.M., and difference in time of 54m E.
(Berlin), to find the E.G.M.T.
10h 02m A.M. L.M.T.
-
54m E. Subtract
9h 08m A.M. E.G.M.T. is the Answer
Example (16c). Given a L.M.T. of 4h 50m A.M., and difference in time of 7h 53m
W. (Los Angeles), to find the E.G.M.T.
4h 50m
A.M. L.M.T.
+ 7h 53m
W. add
12h 43m
- 12h 00m
subtract
0h 43m
P.M. E.G.M.T. is the Answer
The Interval E.G.M.T. is the number of hours and minutes after noon, called a
PLUS INTERVAL, or the number of hours and minutes before noon, called a
MINUS INTERVAL.
Thus in the above examples the E.G.M.T. Interval of (a) is
plus 10h 32m, of (c) is plus 0h 43m. But if the E.G.M.T. is before noon, it must be
subtracted from noon to get the Interval, and the result is then a Minus Interval. Thus
in the above example (b) find the Interval.
12h 00m Noon
-
9h 08m A.M. E.G.M.T.
2h 52m Minus Interval is the Answer
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STEP V. How to Find
the-Constant Proportional
Logarithm.
--A table of proportional logarithms is a decimal mathematical table simplifying
difficult problems in proportion. The Constant Logarithm is the number found in a
table of proportional logarithms corresponding to the E.G.M.T. Interval.
Rule 17.
--To find the Constant Logarithm look in a table of diurnal proportional
logarithms and find the figure corresponding to the E.G.M.T. Interval.
Example (17). Find the Constant Log. for an interval of plus 10h 32m. Interval is 10h
32m. Looking in the table of proportional logarithms in the back of Raphael's
ephemeris I look down the column marked 10h until it intersects with the horizontal
column marked 32m. There I find .3576. Ans.
STEP VI. How to Find the Daily
Motion of Any Planet.
--In recent years the swifter planets have their daily motion given for each day in the
latter part of Raphael's ephemeris.
Rule 18.
--To find the daily zodiacal motion of any planet, consult the ephemeris for the
two days between which the E.G.M.T. occurs and subtract the less longitude from the
greater in the regular order of the zodiacal signs.
5
Example (18). Find the daily zodiacal motion of the Moon Jan. 2, 1920.
3S 08° 31' 47"
Jan. 3
- 2S 23° 43' 38"
Jan. 2
0S 14° 48' 09"
Is the Answer
5
Pluto's position is given in Raphael's ephemeris starting 1934, and in the Pluto ephemeris for earlier
years. Call the days between ephemeris positions (a), the days between ephemeris date and required
date (b), the minutes Pluto moves between these two positions (c), and the motion of Pluto during
required interval (d). Then (a): (b) :: (c) (d).
Thus using the Pluto ephemeris, during the 30 days (a) from December 16, 1919, to January 15, 1920,
Pluto moves 35' (c). The interval between January 2 and January 15 is 13 days (b). 35 multiplied by
13 and divided by 30 gives 15' as the motion of Pluto during this interval. As it is retrograde, add
these 15' to the place of Pluto January 15, and it gives the longitude of Pluto January 2, 1920, as 6
Cancer 36 R.
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Rule 19.
--To find the daily declination motion of any planet, consult the ephemeris for the
two days between which the E.G.M.T. occurs, and if both are either N. or S.
declination subtract the less from the greater; but if one is N. and the other S.
declination, add the given declinations. If the declination is given only every 2nd or
3rd day the result must be divided by 2 or by 3 to get the daily motion.
Example (19a). Find the daily declination motion of Mercury Jan. 2, 1920.
S.22° 51' Jan. 3
-S.22° 39'
Jan. 2
0° 12' daily motion is the Answer
Example (19b). Find the daily declination motion of Venus Apr. 14, 1920.
S.0° 14' Apr. 14
-N.0° 15' Apr. 15
29' daily motion is the Answer
STEP VII. How to Find the
Proportional Logarithm of the
Daily Motion of a Planet.
Rule 20.
--To find the proportional logarithm of a planet's daily motion look in a table of
proportional logarithms and find the ° and ' corresponding to its daily motion.
Example (20). Find the prop. Log. of the Moon's daily notion Jan. 2, 1920. Daily
motion (example 18) 14° 48' 9". Neglecting the 9" I consult the table of logarithms in
Raphael's ephemeris and where the column 14° intersects with 48' I find .2099. Ans.
STEP VIII. How to Find the
Motion of Any Planet for the
E.G.M.T. Interval.
Rule 21.
--To find the distance traveled by any planet during the Interval, add the
Constant Logarithm to the Logarithm of the Daily Motion. This gives the log. of
distance traveled during the Interval.
Example (21). How far in longitude does the Moon travel on Jan. 2, 1920, during a
plus interval of 10h 32m?
10h 32m is
.3576
Constant log.
14h 48m is
+ .2099
Log. of daily mot.
.5675
Log. of Interval
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Looking in table of logarithms I find that .5675 gives 6° 30' which is the Answer.
Note: In using logarithms always use the nearest approximate figure.
STEP IX. To Find the Zodiacal
Longitude of the Planets at Birth.
Rule 22.
--To find the zodiacal longitude of a planet when the Interval is plus, add its
travel for the interval to the place given in the ephemeris for noon. When the Interval
is minus, subtract its travel for the interval from the place given in the ephemeris for
noon. If, however, the planet is retrograde (marked R at top of column in ephemeris)
reverse this, and subtract for plus interval, and add for minus interval.
Example (22). Find the zodiacal longitude of the Moon Jan. 2, 1920, when there is a
plus E.G.M.T. Interval of 10h 32m.
2S 23° 43' 38"
noon
+
6° 30' 00"
mot. int.
3S 00° 13' 38"
or Gemini 0° 14'
STEP X. To Find the Declination
of the Planets at Birth.
Rule 23.
--To find the declination of a planet when the Interval is plus, add the declination
for the interval to the noon declination if the declination is increasing, subtract if
decreasing. When the Interval is minus, subtract the declination for the interval from
the noon declination if the declination is increasing, add if decreasing. If the
declination changes from N to S or S to N, this must be allowed for.
Example (23). Find the declination of the Moon Jan 2, 1920, when there is a minus
Interval of 2h 14m
N 18° 44'
noon
-
0° 16' interval
N 18° 28' Answer
The declination of any house cusp, the Moon's Nodes, or the Part of Fortune is
always that of the Sun when it is in the same sign and degree.
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Rule 24.
--To find the declination of any house cusp, the Moon's Nodes, or the Part of
Fortune
, look in the ephemeris for the position of the Sun in the same sign, degree
and minute, and use this declination
8
Example (24). Find the declination of the Ascendant when Cancer 23° 37' is rising
July 16, 1920, shows the Sun in Cancer 23° 37' , and on that day it also has
declination N 21° 23', which is the Answer.
STEP Xa. How to Find the
Zodiacal Longitude of the Fixed
Stars, the Dragon's Head and Tail,
and the Part of Fortune.
--The zodiacal positions of the fixed stars may be had from tables made for that
purpose. As they move only 1° in about 72 years their places may be had by
inspection. The house positions of the stars, however, for those having considerable
latitude, require the use of trigonometrical calculations.
Example: What important Fixed Star is nearest the Asc in longitude when Cancer
23° 13' rises? Looking in Dalton's "Sixteen Principle Stars" I find on Jan. 2, 1920,
the star Procyon in Cancer 24° 41' 8".
The Dragon's Head is the Moon's north Node, the Dragon's Tail is its south Node.
The North Node is calculated from its place as given in the ephemeris as if it were a
planet, and the South Node is always the same degree of the opposite sign.
Example: Find Moon's Nodes for Jan. 2, 1920, for a plus E.G.M.T. Interval of 10h
32m. Looking in ephemeris for Jan. 2, I find the North Node in Scorpio 22° 17' . The
South node, therefore, is Taurus 22° 17' .
8
Declination of the Angles: Find (a) difference between nearest and next nearest long. In table at the front
of this lesson (page 4). Find (b) difference between nearest long. In table and long. Of Angle. Find (c) difference
between declinations corresponding to nearest and next nearest long. In table. Problem by Logs: (b)
minus (a) plus (c) equals (d) -- correction to be made. Add correction to nearest decl. In table if
nearest long. Is smaller than long. Of Angle; if larger, subtract.
Find decl. Of Ascendant 23° Cancer 15'.
Log. (b) 1.9823
0° 15'
Log. (a) 1.3802
1° 00'
.6021
Log. (c) 2.1170
0° 11'
Log. (d) 2.7191
0° 03'
Subtracting 3' from 21°N29' gives 21°N26' as the Answer.
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The Part of Fortune is a point on the ecliptic (zodiac) as far removed from the
Ascendant by longitude as the Moon is removed from the Sun by longitude.
Rule 25. To find the Part of Fortune, from the sum of the zodiacal
longitudes of the Ascendant and Moon subtract the zodiacal
longitude of the Sun. This difference is the longitude of the Part of
Fortune.
Example (25). Find the Part of Fortune Jan. 2, 1920, for a plus E.G.M.T. Interval of
10h 32m.
4S 23° 13'
Long. Asc.
+ 3S 00° 14'
Long. Moon
7S 23° 27'
Sum
7S 23° 27'
Sum
+12S 00° 00'
Add zodiacal circle
19S 23° 27'
-10S 11° 16'
Longitude of Sun
9S 12° 11'
or Sagittarius 12° 11' is the Answer
STEP XI. How to Place the Planets
in the Chart.
Rule 26.
--The declination of each planet N. or S. having been calculated, it should be
placed opposite its symbol in a column at one side of the chart.
See Example
Chart No. 1 at the front of this lesson.
Rule 27.
--The zodiacal longitude of each planet having been calculated, start with the
Ascendant.
Remember the degrees recorded are those above the horizon in this case,
hence if a planet has less degrees of the same sign it must be placed above the house
cusp in the 12th, but if it has more degrees it must be placed in the chart below the
Asc. Then proceed around the chart in the order of sequence of the houses entering
the planets in their signs, placing those having less degrees than the house cusp next
back toward the Ascendant, and those having more degrees than the house cusp in the
house farther removed from the Asc. following the proper order of sequence of
houses.
The Moon's Nodes, Part of Fortune, and Fixed Stars having little latitude may
be placed in the chart in the same manner.
Fixed Stars having much latitude must
be entered by R.A. and Dec. (See Dalton's Fixed Stars.)
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Note: As in thousands of birthcharts erected and progressed to the date of some
event, The Brotherhood of Light Research Department has found no instance where
a Fixed Star, the Moon's Nodes, or the Part of Fortune has been required to explain
either the character of an individual or any event that has happened to him, we make
no use of them. It must be remembered that the positions in a chart of Uranus,
Neptune and Pluto were unknown to earlier astrologers, who doubtless became
aware of influences apart from the seven naked eye orbs, and accounted for them as
best they could.