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Chapter 2
Major Progressions Of Sun And Angles
IT was Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, followed to its practical and logical
conclusions which led to the discovery of releasing and utilizing atomic energy. And
it is this same Special Theory of Relativity followed to its practical and logical
conclusions which indicates both how inner-plane energies operate and what can be
done to cause them to work more to the individual's advantage.
As university scientists have conclusively demonstrated that time, distance and
gravitation on the inner plane have properties radically different than they have on
earth, should we expect inner-plane weather to operate according to the same laws
weather operates on earth? Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity carried to its
logical conclusions indicates that inner-plane weather affects the individual not
merely according to his inner-plane constitution, but through certain time-space
relationships that bring structural changes within his astral body.
Astrological energies constitute the inner-plane weather. How this inner-plane
weather affects an individual, however, is not dependent upon any theory; for even as
the time, distance and gravitation properties of the inner plane have been determined
experimentally by university scientists, so have the properties of inner-plane
weather, and how it works to affect individuals, groups, cities, nations and world
affairs been determined experimentally, and through statistical studies carried out in
the process of astrological research.
One of the outstanding influences of inner-plane weather is that when a person,
creature or important event is born, it is born at a time when the inner-plane weather
tends to coincide with the inner-plane make-up of that which is then born. Thus does
the inner-plane weather at the time of his birth, as mapped by his birth chart, indicate
the predisposition of an individual to develop abilities of a certain type. The
planetary positions and aspects, whatever they may be, which indicate such a
predisposition arc called its birth chart constants. The statistically ascertained birth
chart constants of 30 different vocations arc set forth in the reference book HOW TO
SELECT A VOCATION*
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The predispositions indicated by the inner-plane weather conditions at birth never
manifest as events or diseases except during those periods when the appropriate
thought-cells receive commensurate additional energy from inner-plane weather
mapped by progressed aspects.
Inner-plane weather consists of astrological vibrations in their infinite variety of
combinations. Those mapped by progressed aspects enable planetary vibrations to
reach and make active certain groups of thought-cells. These thought-cells have
desires such as were imparted to them when they were formed and as indicated by the
aspects of the planets mapping them in the birth chart. Such desires are temporarily
altered by the planetary energy reaching them through the inner-plane weather
mapped by a progressed aspect. And the additional energy thus reaching the
thought-cells not only gives them the power to influence the individual's thoughts
and behavior, but it also gives them the psychokinetic activity that enables them to
attract events of the kind they desire into his life.
By far the most important inner-plane weather is mapped by major progressed
aspects. Church of Light statistical research covering the lives of many thousands of
persons indicates that every important event of life takes place during the period
while a major progressed aspect is present involving planets characteristic of the
nature of the event, and which rule the birth chart house governing the department of
life affected. If more than one department of life is pronouncedly affected by the
event, at the time it occurs there are always major progressed aspects involving the
ruler of each house governing these various departments of life.
The periods in his life when the individual is likely to experience a specific event,
condition or disease toward which he has a predisposition are indicated by certain
major progressed aspects. These progressed aspects mapping inner-plane weather
conditions which have been found always to coincide with the given event, condition
or disease are called its progressed constants. The statistically ascertained
progressed constants of 20 different events are set forth in the reference book WHEN
AND WHAT EVENTS WILL HAPPEN,* and both birth chart constants and the
progressed constants of 160 different diseases are set forth in Course XVI,
STELLAR HEALING.
Both the birth chart position and the progressed position of a planet act as terminals
for the reception of planetary energy. Each terminal actually involved in the
progressed aspect receives the energy of the progressed aspect in full volume. But
unless the progressed aspect is from a major progressed planet to its birth chart
place--in which case there are only two terminals--each progressed aspect has two
other terminals not directly involved in the progressed aspect. Each of these two
terminals not directly involved in the progressed aspect receives, through the
principle of resonance, one-half as much energy as is received by each terminal
directly involved.
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It is important to understand that commonly a major progressed aspect has four
terminals because our research has determined that each major progressed constant
of an event or disease is always reinforced by a minor progressed aspect heavier than
from the Moon to one of its four terminals at the time the event occurs or the disease
develops; and that each reinforced major progressed constant of an event or disease is
always released by a transit aspect heavier than from the Moon to one of its four
terminals at the time the event occurs or the disease develops. And an independent
minor progressed aspect is always released by a transit aspect to one of the birth chart
or major progressed terminals influenced by the minor progressed aspect at the time
the event takes place.
Before an ephemeris of Pluto was available to permit its aspects to be included, there
seemed to be indications that events influenced by progressed aspects of Sun or Mars
occasionally took place while the aspect was as much as a degree and half from
perfect. But as statistically indicated in C. of L. Astrological Report No. 61,
published in the January, 1948,* number of The Rising Star, in these instances while
sometimes the zodiacal aspect was well over the one degree limit, at the same time
there was a progressed parallel aspect involving the significant planet which was not
over the one degree limit.
The more closely the planets approach the perfect progressed aspect the greater the
amount of energy the temporary stellar aerial in the astral body is capable of picking
up, radio fashion, and transmitting to the thought-cells at its direct and indirect
terminals, and the more capable these become of influencing events.
Due to the reinforcement effect of minor progressed aspects to any of the four
terminals of the major progressed aspect, to the trigger effect of transit aspects to any
of the four terminals of the major progressed aspect, and to the physical environment
through which events must come, the important events attracted by major progressed
aspects seldom arrive exactly on the date the progressed aspect is perfect. But other
things being equal, they are more apt to arrive close to the date the major progressed
aspect is perfect than while the aspect is farther removed. Therefore, that the time and
nature of the important events which will be attracted into the life--unless they are
forestalled by precautionary actions--may be estimated in advance, it is essential
that the time be known when each major progressed aspect becomes perfect.
As major progressions arc measured by the ratio of the movements of the planets
during one apparent solar day releasing energy which causes the chief structural
changes within the astral body that takes place during one astrological year of life,
the movements and positions of the planets each four minutes after birth indicate the
structural changes that take place within the astral body each corresponding day after
birth; the movements and positions of the planets each two hours after birth spread
the structural changes so shown over each corresponding month of life after birth;
and the movements and the positions of the planets each day after birth indicate the
structural changes and events attracted during the corresponding year and time of
year of life.
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The noon positions (or midnight positions if a midnight ephemeris is used) of the
planets as given in the ephemeris must thus represent their major progressed
positions for some year, month and day of calendar time either before or after birth.
And as on an average the progressed positions of the planets on the birthday are no
closer or farther from making perfect progressed aspects than the progressed
positions of the planets for any other day of the year, the calendar date which
corresponds to the ephemeris positions of the planets on the day of birth is the most
convenient starting point for calculating the calendar date any major progressed
aspect is perfect. Its originator called the calendar date thus found the LIMITING
DATE.
Finding the Limiting Date
--The Limiting Date (abbreviated L.D.) is the date in calendar time corresponding to
the major progressed positions of the planets on the day of birth as they are shown in
the ephemeris. Convert the EGMT Interval of birth into months and days of calendar
time by dividing the hours by 2 and calling the result months, and dividing the
minutes by 4 and calling the result days.
If the EGMT Interval of birth is minus, add the calendar interval thus found to the
year and month of birth. If the EGMT Interval of birth is plus, subtract the calendar
interval thus found from the year, month and day of birth. The L.D. thus found is the
calendar starting point from which all major progressed aspects and positions are
calculated. As the birth chart positions of the planets are calculated for an EGMT
Interval, the most convenient time for finding the L.D. is while the chart is being
erected. However, should an EGMT Interval on the day preceding or following birth
be used in finding the planets, places, this must not be employed in finding the L.D.
Instead, the EGMT Interval on the day of birth must be ascertained; for the L.D. must
always be calculated from the EGMT Interval on the day of birth.
On B. of L. student
blanks a space is designated on which to write the L.D. It may be in the year of birth,
in the year previous to birth, or in the year following birth. In writing it down be sure
to include not only the month and day of month, but also the year in which it falls.
Example 1: Chart la, Jan. 2, 1920, has an EGMT Interval of plus 10h 32m. What is the
Limiting Date?
10 divided by 2 gives 5 as the month. 32 divided by 4 gives 8 as the days. As the
interval is plus, the 5 months, 8 days must be subtracted from Jan. 2, 1920. This gives
July 24, 1919, as the L.D. This means that the places of the planets given in the
ephemeris for Jan. 3, 1920 (one day after birth) are their major progressed positions
for July 24, 1920. The Map. D. for calendar year 1920 is thus Jan. 3, 1920.
Example 2: Chart 316, Dec. 17, 1920, has an EGMT Interval of minus 3h 30m. What
is the Limiting Date?
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3 divided by 2 gives 1 month with a remainder of 60 minutes. 60m plus 30m gives
90m. 90 divided by 4 gives 22½ as the days. As the interval is minus, this 1 month,
22½ days must be added to Dec. 17, 1920. This gives Feb. 9, 1921, as the L.D. This
means that the positions of the planets on the day of birth, Dec. 17, 1920, are their
major progressed positions for Feb. 9, 1921; and that their positions as shown in the
ephemeris for Dec. 18, 1920, are their major progressed positions for Feb. 9, 1922.
Likewise, the positions of the planets in the ephemeris for Dec. 28, 1920, are their
major progressed positions for Feb. 9, 1932. Which means that the Map. D. for 1932
is Dec. 28, 1920.
Example 3: The birth chart of Henry Ford (Course X-I, Chapter 5) has an EGMT
Interval of plus 7h 56m. What is the Limiting Date?
7 divided by 2 gives 3 as the months, with a remainder of 60m. These added to 56m
gives 116m 116 divided by 4 gives 29 as the days. As the Interval is plus, this 3mo
29d must be subtracted from July 30, 1863, which is the date of birth. This gives April
1, 1863, as the L.D. July 31, 1863, represents the major progressed positions, and is
the Map.D. for April 1, 1864; and Aug. 1, 1863, represents the major progressed
positions for April 1, 1865. and is thus the Map.D. for 1865.
Finding the Major Progression Date
--Both the L.D. and the Major Progression Date should always be calculated from
the date of birth in the ephemeris. Using the day preceding or following birth in the
ephemeris is the most common source of error in calculating major progressions. The
Major Progression Date (abbreviated Map.D.) is the ephemeris day which shows the
major progressed positions of the planets for the month and day of the Limiting Date,
but for some calendar year. To find the Map.D. for any calendar year, count ahead in
the ephemeris from the day of birth as many days as complete years have elapsed
since the Limiting Date. The ephemeris day so located is the required Map.D.
Examples 1, 2 and 3 illustrate the process.
Finding the Midheaven Constant
--As explained in Chapter 1, the M.C. progresses--by major progression, by
minor progression, and by transit progression--exactly the same number of signs, °s
and 's that the Sun progresses through the zodiac during the same time. As the
progressed aspects made by the M.C. and Asc. are extremely important--next in
importance to those made by the Sun--it is advisable to reduce the work of
calculating a series of them, once for all, in each chart by finding the Midheaven
Constant.
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The Midheaven Constant (abbreviated M.C.C.) is the distance in the chart of birth
between the M.C. and the Sun in signs, °s and 's expressed as a plus or minus, so that
when added to the sign °, and ' occupied by the M.C. the algebraic sum gives the sign,
°, and ' occupied by the Sun. It is found by merely subtracting the smaller zodiacal
longitude occupied by birth chart M.C. or Sun, from the larger zodiacal longitude
occupied by birth chart M.C. or Sun, and placing before the signs, °s, and 's thus
found the proper plus or minus sign.
Then, wherever the M.C. may be by progression--major, minor or
transit--algebraically add the sign, °, and ' it occupies to the M.C.C. and the result is
the sign, °, and ' occupied by the progressed Sun. And wherever the progressed Sun
may be, change the sign before the M.C.C. and algebraically add it to the sign, °, and '
occupied by the progressed Sun and the result is the sign, °, and ' occupied by the
progressed M.C.
Example 4: In chart la, the Sun is 11 Capricorn 16 and the M.C. is 5 Aries 45. From
10S 11° 16' subtract 1S 5° 45' and it gives 9S 5° 31'. As to find the position of the Sun
the difference so found must be added to the M.C., the M.C.C. is plus 9S 5° 31'.
Example 5: In chart 316, the Sun is 25 Sagittarius 08 and the M.C. is 16 Cancer 45.
From 9S 25° 08' subtract 4S 16° 45' and it gives 5S 8° 23'. As to find the position of
the Sun the difference so found must be added to the M.C., the M.C.C. is plus 5S 8°
23'.
Example 7: In the Henry Ford chart (Course X-I, Chapter 5), the Sun is 7 Leo 06 and the
M.C. is 12 Virgo 00. From 6S 12° 00' subtract 5S 7° 06' and it gives 1S 4° 54'. As to
find the position of the Sun the difference so found must be subtracted from the M.C.,
the M.C.C. is minus 1S 4° 54'.
The Problems of Progressions
--The calculations involved in chart erection, major progressions, minor
progressions and transit progressions are chiefly the solution of problems in direct
proportion such as are taught in grammar school. In each problem (a): (b) :: (c) : (d)
In thus solving problems in proportion, as the product of the means is equal to the
product of the extremes, when the two inner terms are given, multiply one by the
other and divide the product by the outer term. When the two outer terms are given,
multiply one by the other and divide the product by the inner term. The result is the
answer.
Any of these problems in proportion can be solved in four different ways. They can
be solved by direct proportion, they can be solved by logarithms, they can be solved
with a slide rule, or they can be solved with The Church of Light Chart Calculator.
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In mathematically handling proportions involving hours and minutes and °s and 's,
the use of logarithms greatly reduces the labor. Each problem in proportion
considered in this book can be worked either by direct proportion, or by logarithms.
By either method the letter employed to designate each term of the proportion is as
follows:
(a) is the ephemeris daily gain, or gain through some constant interval of time or
space.
When only one planet or position is moving, as when a planet is moving to make an
aspect with some birth chart position, the ephemeris daily gain (a) is the daily motion
of the planet. When both planets or positions are direct in motion, or when both
planets or positions are retrograde in motion, subtract the ephemeris daily motion of
the slower moving planet from the ephemeris daily motion of the faster moving
planet. The result is (a) the ephemeris daily gain. When one planet or position is
direct in motion and the other is retrograde in motion, add the two daily motions.
Their sum is (a) the ephemeris daily gain.
(b) is the gain during some selected interval of time or space.
(c) is the constant interval of time or space.
(d) is some selected interval of time or space.
In employing direct proportion to solve problems in progression it is more
convenient to work immediately with calendar time. But in employing logarithms it
is more convenient to work the problem first in terms of progression time (EGMT
Interval), and then convert the result so found into calendar time. Diurnal
proportional logarithms such as are to be found in the back of most ephemerides arc
constructed to solve just such problems in proportion, term (c), which is always 1440
minutes (24 hours) , being taken care of by the table.
The advantage of such logarithms, which are almost universally used in erecting
birth charts to find how many °s and 's a planet moves during a given EGMT Interval,
is that the logarithm of term (b) can be obtained merely by adding the logarithms of
term (a) and (d); and the logarithm of term (d) can be obtained merely by subtracting
the logarithm of term (a) from the logarithm of term (b).
To designate the birth chart position of a planet it has become the custom to use the
letter r after the planet, to designate a major progressed planet to use the letter p after
the planet, to designate a minor progressed planet to use the letter m after the planet,
and to designate a transit progressed planet to use the letter t after the planet.
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Finding the Major Progressed Positions of the
Planets on a Given Calendar Date
--Find the plus or minus calendar interval in months and days the given date is from
the nearest month and day of the L.D. Then find the Map. D. in the ephemeris for the
L.D. from which the given calendar date is this number of months and days distant.
Convert the calendar interval from the L.D. in that calendar year into EGMT Interval
(major progression time) at the rate of each month being equivalent to 2 hours, and
each day being equivalent to 4 minutes. If the calendar interval is plus the EGMT
Interval thus found is plus; if the calendar interval is minus the EGMT Interval thus
found is minus. Use this EGMT Interval on the Map. D. in the ephemeris exactly as if
finding the birth chart positions of the planets for this EGMT Interval on that
ephemeris day.
Example 8: Find the major progressed positions of the planets on Nov. 24, 1949, for
chart la. In example I the L.D. is found to be July 24, 1919. Subtracting 7mo 24d from
11mo 24d gives a plus calendar interval of 4mo. Multiplying 4 by 2 gives a plus 8h
EGMT Interval. Subtracting 1919(L.D.) from 1949 gives 30. Adding 30 days to
January 2, 1920 (date of birth) gives February 1 as the Map. D. Using the planetary
positions on Feb. 1, 1920, and calculating their positions for a plus EGMT Interval of
8 hours, gives their major progressed positions on November 24, 1949, as shown on
in chart 1a in the front of Chapter 3.
Example 9: Find the major progressed positions of the planets on April 24, 1934, for
chart 316. In example 2 the L.D. is found to be Feb. 9, 1921. Subtracting 2mo 9d from
4mo 24d gives a plus 2mo 15d calendar interval. Multiplying 2 by 2 gives 4h.
Multiplying 15 by 4 gives 60m, or 1h. There is thus a plus 5h EGMT Interval.
Subtracting 1921 (L.D.) from 1934, gives 13. Adding 13 days to Dec. 17, 1920 (date
of birth) gives Dec. 30, 1920, as the Map. D. Using the planetary positions on Dec.
30, 1920, and calculating their positions for a plus EGMT Interval of 5h, gives their
major progressed positions on April 24, 1934, as shown in chart 316 in the front of Chapter 3.
Finding the Major, Minor or Transit Progressed
M.C. on a Given Date
--First find the sign, °, and ' occupied by the progressed Sun on the given calendar
date. Change the sign before the M.C.C. and algebraically add the M.C.C. to the sign,
°, and ' occupied by the progressed Sun. The result is the precise progressed M.C.
Example 10: Find major progressed M.C. for chart la on November 24, 1949. In
example 4 the M.C.C. for this chart is shown to be plus 9S 5° 31 ' . Major progressed
Sun on November 24, 1949, is 11 Aquarius 41. Subtracting 9S 5° 31' from 11S 11°
41' gives 2S 6° 10'. Thus progressed M.C. is 6 Taurus 10.
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Example 11: Find major progressed M.C. for chart 316 on April 24, 1934. In example
5 the M.C.C. of this chart is shown to be plus 5S 8° 23'. Major progressed Sun on
April 24, 1934, is 8 Capricorn 44. Subtracting 5S 8° 23' from 10S 8° 44' gives 5S 0°
21'. Thus progressed M.C. is 0 Leo 21.
Finding the Major, Minor or Transit Progressed
Asc. on a Given Date
--In a table of houses look between the two columns within which the progressed
M.C. occurs, and find (a) the °s and 's between the nearest and next nearest Asc. given
for the latitude nearest that of birth.
Find (c) the °s and 's between the nearest and next nearest M.C. given in the table. In
Dalton's, AP, Raphael's and RC tables this is always 1° (60') .
Find (d) the °s and 's between the true M.C. and the M.C. given in the table.
By proportion reduce each term to 's, then multiply ( a ) by ( d ) and divide the product
by ( c ) . This gives (b), the distance the Asc. is from the nearest Asc. given in the table
for the nearest latitude given in the table.
By logarithms, to log. (a) add log. (d),and from the sum so found subtract log. (c).
The result is log. (b), the distance the Asc. is from the nearest Asc. given in the table
for the nearest latitude given in the table.
If the true M.C. is smaller than the M.C. given in the table, subtract (b) from the
nearest Asc. in the table. If the true M.C. is greater than the M.C. given in the table,
add (b) to the nearest Asc. in the table.
This gives the Asc. for the latitude given in the table. If the latitude of birth is not precisely
that given in the table, use the Correction For Latitude given in the front of Chapter 3.
Example 12: Find major progressed Asc. for chart la on November 24, 1949. In
example 10 the major progressed M.C. for this date is shown to be 6 Taurus 10. AP
and Raphael's tables give the Asc. for 6 Taurus as 1 5 Leo 39 and the Asc. for 7
Taurus as 16 Leo 24. The difference (a) is thus 45'. As 6 Taurus 10 is 10' more than 6
Taurus, (d) is 10'. (c) is 60'. By proportion, multiplying 45 by 10 gives 450. 450
divided by 60 gives 7½'. By logarithms, the sum of log. (a) 1.5051 and log. (d)
2.1584 is 3.6635. Subtracting log. (c) 1.3802 from 3.6635 gives 2.2833, which is the
log. of (b) 7½'. To the Asc. for 6 Taurus, which is 15 Leo 39, we add 8' (considering
the ½ as 1), which, as the table is for the precise latitude of birth, gives the
progressed Asc. as 15 Leo 47'.
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Example 13: Find major progressed Asc. for chart 316 on April 24, 1934. In example
11 the major progressed M.C. for this date is shown to be 0 Leo 21. Dalton's table
gives the Asc. for 0 Leo in latitude 40 as 25 Libra 38, and the Asc. for 1 Leo as 26
Libra 27. The difference (a) is 49'. As 0 Leo 21 is 21' more than 0 Leo, (d) is 21'. (c) is
60'. By proportion, multiplying 49 by 21 gives 1029. 1029 divided by 60 gives 17.
By logarithms, the sum of log. (a) 1.4682 and log. (d) 1.8361 is 3.3043. Subtracting
log. (c) 1.3802 from 3.3043 gives log. 1.9241, which is the log. of (b) 17'. To the.
Asc. for 0 Leo, which is 25 Libra 38, we add 17', which gives the progressed Asc. for
the latitude given in the table as 25 Libra 55.
But as the true latitude of birth is 39° 45', there is a correction to be made for (d) the
15' difference in latitude. Under the 0 Leo column the table gives 25 Libra 52 for
latitude 39, and 25 Libra 38 for latitude 40, a difference of (a) 14'. (c) is 60'.
Following the instructions given in the front of Chapter 3, by proportion, multiplying(a)
14 by (d) 15 gives 210. Dividing 210 by 60 gives (b) 3½'. By logarithms, subtracting log.
(c) 1.3802 from log. (d) 1.9823 gives .6021. Adding log. (a) 2.0122 to .6021 gives
2.6143, which is the log. of (b) 3½'
As the true latitude is less than the nearest latitude given in the table and the 's are
decreasing with latitude, we add the correction of 3½' to 25 Libra 55, which
(considering the ½ as 1) gives the progressed Asc. as 25 Libra 59.
Finding the Calendar Date on Which a Major
Progressed Aspect Between Planets is Perfect
--Find the Map. D. in the ephemeris nearest the ephemeris time the aspect is perfect.
Find (a) the daily gain in °s and 's of the one planet on the other as indicated on the
Map. D. in the ephemeris.
Find (b) the °s and 's the aspect is from perfect. In employing proportion (c) is 12
months or 365 days. In employing logarithms (c) is 24h EGMT Interval.
In employing proportion (d) is months and days of calendar time from the L.D. in the
calendar year it takes the planets to close the gap (b) and make the perfect aspect.
In employing logarithms (d) is the number of hours and minutes of EGMT Interval
on the Map.D. it takes the planets to close the gap (b)and make the perfect aspect.
This EGMT Interval must then be converted into its equivalent plus or minus
calendar interval at the rate of each 2 hours being equal to 1 month and each 4 minutes
equal to 1 day. By either method if the aspect is formed before the positions given in
the ephemeris, subtract the calendar interval thus found from the L.D. in the calendar
year. If the aspect is formed after the positions given in the ephemeris, add the
calendar interval thus found to the L.D. in the calendar year. This gives the calendar
date the aspect is perfect.
By proportion, to find (d) multiply (b) by (c) and divide by (a).
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By logarithms, to find (d) subtract log. (a) from log.(b).
Example 14: The L.D. for chart la was found to be July 24, 1919. On what date does
the Sun make the conjunction with Uranus r by major progression?
Uranus r is 29 Aquarius 03. Turning to the 1920 ephemeris we find the Sun on Feb.
19, 1920, in 29 Aquarius 34, and thus (b) 31 ' past the perfect aspect. Between Feb. 18
and Feb. 19, 1920, the Sun is moving (a) 61'.
By proportion, multiplying (b) 31 by (c) 12 gives 372. Dividing 372 by (a) 61 gives
the calendar interval (d) as 6 6/61 months, or 6mo 3d.
By logarithms, subtract log. (a) 61', 1.3730 from log. (b) 31', 1.6670, and it gives log.
.2940, which is the log. of (d) 12h 12m. Dividing 12 by 2 gives 6mo. Dividing 12 by 4
gives 3 days.
Counting ahead in the ephemeris from the day of birth, January 2, 1920, we find that
Feb. 19 is 48 days later. Adding 48 years to the L.D., July 24, 1919, gives 1967 as the
calendar year for Map. D. Feb. 19, 1920. As the aspect was formed before the
positions given in the ephemeris on Feb. 19, 1920, we subtract the calendar interval
6mo 3d from July 24, 1967. This gives the date of progressed Sun conjunction
Uranus r as January 21, 1967.
Progressing the Sun
--Examples of finding the dates of major progressed aspects of the other planets will
be found in Chapters 3 and 4. For precision the calendar date on which
each progressed aspect involving the Sun is perfect should be determined in the
manner above indicated. But as the daily motion of the Sun varies only from 57' to 61
', its approximate major progression per month is 1/12 of this, or approximately 5 ';
and 1 ' progression is thus equivalent approximately to 6 days of calendar time. Thus
when there is no need for precision it is more convenient to work progressed aspects
of the Sun by proportion.
Example 6: Find date on which in chart la major progressed Sun makes the
semi-square with Venus r. Venus is 28 Scorpio 18. The Sun must therefore reach 13
Capricorn 18 to make the semi-square. In example 1, we found the L.D. for this chart
to be July 24, 1919. On January 4, 1920, the ephemeris shows the Sun 12 Capricorn
51. It must therefore move 27' to make the aspect. Dividing 27 by 5 ('s of Sun travel
per month) gives 5mo. Multiplying the remaining 2' by 6 (days the Sun travels in 1')
gives us 12d.
Counting ahead in the ephemeris from the day of birth, January 2, 1920, we find
January 4 is 2 days later. Adding 2 years to the L.D. July 24, 1919, gives 1921 as the
calendar year for the Map. D. As the aspect was formed after the positions given in
the ephemeris, we add the 5mo 12d to July 24, 1921, and it gives the date of Sun
semi-square Venus r as January 6, 1922.
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When the actual travel of the Sun on the Map. D., 61', is used, the more precise date
obtained by either proportion or logarithms is January 3, 1922. The problem worked
out in detail by logarithms is given at the front of Chapter 1.
Finding the Sign, °, and ' on the M.C. for a Given
Asc.
--If the table of houses does not give the precise latitude of birth, find the Correction
for Latitude as explained in the front of Chapter 3.
When the true latitude is less than the nearest latitude given in the table: If the table
shows the 's decreasing with latitude, the correction is subtracted. If the table shows
the 's increasing with latitude, the correction is added.
When the true latitude of birth is greater than the nearest latitude given in the table: If
the table shows the 's decreasing with latitude, the correction is added. If the table
shows the 's increasing with latitude, the correction is subtracted.
This gives the Asc. for the nearest latitude given in the table.
Find (a) the °s and 's between the nearest and the next nearest M.C. in the table. In
Dalton's, AP, Raphael's and RC tables this is always 1° (60').
Find (c) the °s and 's between the nearest and the next nearest Asc. given in the table.
Find (d) the °s and 's between the true Asc. corrected for the latitude given in the
table, and the nearest Asc. for that latitude given in the table.
(b) is the distance the true M.C. is from the nearest M.C. given in the table.
By proportion, to find (b), multiply (a) by (d) and divide the product by (c). By
logarithms, add log. (a) to log. (d) and from their sum subtract log. (c).
Example 15: In chart 1a what sign, ° and ' is on the M.C. when progressed Asc. makes
the conjunction with Neptune r? To make the conjunction the progressed Asc. must
move to 10 Leo 55. Looking in the table of houses for New York we find the nearest
Asc. 11 Leo 08, with 30 Aries 00 on the M.C. The next nearest Asc. is 10 Leo 24. The
difference (c) is 44' The difference (d) between 10 Leo 55 and 11 Leo 08 is 13'. By
proportion, multiplying (a) 60 by (d) 13 gives 780. Dividing 780 by (c) 44 gives 18'.
By logarithms, adding log. (a) 1.3802 to log. (d) 2.0444 gives log. 3.4246.
Subtracting log. (c) 1.5149 from 3.4246 gives 1.9097, which is the log. of (b) 18'.
As the Asc. when the aspect is complete is less than the nearest Asc. given in the
tables, the 18' must be subtracted from 30 Aries 00. This gives the progressed M.C.
29 Aries 42.
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Example 16: In chart 316 what sign, ° and ' is on the M.C. when progressed Asc.
makes the trine with Pluto r? To make the trine with Pluto r the Asc. must move to 8
Scorpio 04. Dalton's table of houses shows 15 Leo 00 on the M.C. when 7 Scorpio 40
is on the Asc. in lat. 40, and 8 Scorpio 01 on the Asc. in lat. 39. As chart 316 is erected
for lat. 39:45, there is a correction to be made for (d) 15' of latitude. (a) is 21', the
difference between 7 Scorpio 40 and 8 Scorpio 01. Multiplying (a) 21' by (d) 15'
gives 315. 315 divided by (c) 60' gives the correction for latitude as 5'. Subtracting
this 5' from 8 Scorpio 04 shows that when 8 Scorpio 04 is on the Asc. in lat. 39 :45, 7
Scorpio 59 is on the Asc. in lat. 40, the lat. given in the table. We need to find,
therefore, the sign, °, and ' on the M.C. when the table shows 7 Scorpio 59 on the Asc.
in lat. 40.
In lat. 40 the table shows 7 Scorpio 40 as the nearest Asc. and 8 Scorpio 27 as the next
nearest. The difference (c) is 47' The difference (d) between 7 Scorpio 40 and 7
Scorpio 59 is 19'. By proportion, multiplying (a) 60 by (d) 19 gives 1140. Dividing
1140 by (c) 47 gives 24'. By logarithms, adding log. (a) 1.3802 to log. (d) 1.8796
gives log. 3.2598. Subtracting log. (c) 1.4863 from 3.2598 gives 1.7735, which is the
log. of (b) 24'.
As the Asc. when the aspect is complete is more than the nearest Asc. given in the
table, the 24' must be added to 15 Leo 00. This gives the progressed M.C. 1 5 Leo 24.
Finding the Calendar Date from Major, Minor
or Transit Progressed M.C.
--Algebraically add the sign, °, and ' of the progressed M.C. to the M.C.C. The result
is the sign, °, and ' occupied by the progressed Sun on the sought calendar date. Thus
when the sign, °, and ' occupied by the Asc. when it makes an aspect is determined,
the sign, °, and ' on the M.C. for this Asc. can be ascertained as above explained. And
when the sign, °, and ' occupied by the progressed M.C. when it makes an aspect is
determined--as when it makes an aspect to a birth chart planet-this can be used. In
either case, from the M.C. find the sign, °, and ' occupied by the progressed Sun by
algebraically adding to it the M.C.C. Then find the calendar date on which the
progressed Sun occupies the sign, °, and ' so found. This is the precise date on which
the progressed Asc. or M.C. makes the aspect, or reaches the given sign, °, and ' of the
zodiac.
Example 17: In chart la, on what date does major progressed Asc. make the
conjunction with Neptune r? In example 15 we found the aspect is perfect when 29
Aries 42 is on the progressed M.C. In example 4 we found the M.C.C. for this chart to
be plus 9S 5° 31'. Adding 9S 5° 31' to 1S 29° 42' gives the major progressed position
of the Sun 11S 5° 13'. On January 26, 1920, the ephemeris gives the Sun 5 Aquarius
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15. This is 2' past the required position, and as the Sun moves at the rate of 1 ' for each
6 days by major progression, this is equivalent to 12 days to be subtracted from the
L.D. July 24, in the calendar year, giving July 12. As January 26 is 24 days after birth,
we add 24 years to the year of the L.D., 1919. Asc. is conjunction Neptune r July 12,
1943.
Example 18: In chart 316, on what date does major progressed Asc. make the trine
with Pluto r? In example 16 we found the aspect is perfect when 15 Leo 24 is on the
M.C. In example 5 we found the M.C.C. for this chart to be 5S 8° 23'. Adding 5S 8°
23' to 5S 15° 24' gives the major progressed position of the Sun as 10S 23° 47'. On
January 14, 1921, the ephemeris gives the Sun 23 Capricorn 49. This is 2' past the
required position, and as the Sun moves at the rate of 1' for each 6 days major
progression, this is equivalent to 12 days to be subtracted from the L.D. February 9,
in the calendar year, giving (ignoring the 31 days in January) January 27. As January
14 is 28 days after birth, we add the 28 years to the year of the L.D., 1921. Asc. is trine
Pluto r January 27, 1949.
Finding the Progressed Zodiacal Motion of
Major, Minor or Transit M.C. or Asc.
--In a table of houses find the nearest Asc. to that the motion of which is to be
ascertained for the latitude nearest that of birth. The difference in Asc. motions
between consecutive latitudes is so small that using the motion for the nearest
latitude is sufficiently precise.
Find (a) the difference in °s and 's between the nearest and the next nearest Asc. given
in the two columns within which the progressed Asc. is found.
Find (c) the difference in °s and 's between the nearest and the next nearest M.C.
given in the same two columns in the table. In Dalton's, AP, Raphael's and RC tables
this is always 1° (60').
Find (d) the daily motion of the Sun in °s and 's as given in the ephemeris on the Map.
D., MED, or Transit Date. This is also the number of °s and 's traveled by the
progressed M.C. during the same progressed interval. It is the daily motion of the M.
C. on the Map. D., MED, or Transit Date.
By proportion, multiply (a) by (d) and divide the product by (c). This gives (b). By
logarithm, add log. (a) to log. (d) , and from the sum subtract log. (c). This gives log.
(b). (b) thus found is the °s and 's the Asc. moves during the same major, minor or
transit progression interval moved by the Sun. It is the daily motion of the Asc. on the
Map. D. MED, or Transit Date.
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Finding the Calendar Date on Which an Aspect
Involving Major Progressed M.C. or Asc. is
Perfect.
--From the daily motion of the M.C. or Asc. on the Map. D., and the daily motion of
the planet on the Map. D., find (a) the gain of the one on the other in °s and 's. If the
aspect is from progressed M.C. or Asc. to a birth chart position, (a) is the daily motion
of M.C. or Asc.
Find (b) the °s and 's the aspect is from perfect. To find (b) first find the sign, °, and '
occupied by the progressed M.C. or Asc. on the Map. D. Then find the sign, °, and '
occupied by the progressed planet on the Map. D. The °s and 's which are less
subtracted from the °s and 's which are greater, gives the °s and 's the aspect is from
perfect.
(c) is 12mo calendar time or 24h EGMT Interval.
With (a) , (b) and (c) thus ascertained the date the aspect is perfect is found exactly as
in finding the date on which a major progressed aspect between planets is perfect.
Example 19: In chart la, on what date does major progressed Sun make the
opposition of progressed Asc.? On Feb. 20, 1920, the ephemeris shows Sun 0 Pisces
34. Subtracting the M.C.C. 9S 5° 31' found in example 4, from 12S 0° 34' gives the
progressed M.C. for this Map. D. 25 Taurus 03. The Asc. when 25 Taurus 03 is on the
M.C. as worked from the table of houses for New York is 0 Virgo 31. Progressed
Sun, moving faster than progressed Asc. is thus (b) 3' past the perfect opposition.
The Sun on Feb. 20, and therefore the M.C., is moving 60'. The Asc. is moving 48'
while the M.C. moves 60'. The gain (a) of the Sun on the Asc. is the difference
between 48' and 60' or 12'.
By proportion, multiplying (b) 3 by (c) 12 gives 36. Dividing 36 by (a) 12 gives 3mo.
By logarithms, subtracting log. (a) 2.0792 from log. (b) 2.6812 gives log. (d) .6020
which is the log. of 6h. Dividing 6 by 2 gives 3mo. Subtracting the 3mo from the L.D.
July 24, in the calendar year, gives April 24. Feb. 20 is 49 days after the day of birth
on Jan. 2. To the year of the L.D., 1919, we therefore add 49 years. Progressed Sun is
opposition Asc. p April 24, 1968.
Example 20: In chart 316, when does major progressed Mercury make the sextile
with major progressed Asc.? The Map. D. for 1930 is 9 days after birth, or Dec. 26,
1920. The ephemeris position of Mercury on this date is 22 Sagittarius 23. The
position of the Sun on Dec. 26, 1920, is 4 Capricorn 27. In example 5 we found the
M.C.C. of this chart to be plus 5S 8° 23'. Subtracting 5S 8° 23' from 10S 4° 27' gives
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the progressed M.C. on the Map. D. 26 Cancer 04. Dalton's table of houses shows 22
Libra 19 on Asc. in lat. 40 when 26 Cancer 00 is on M.C. Asc. moves 50' while M.C.
moves 60'. Thus when 26 Cancer 04 is on the M.C. 22 Libra 22 is on the Asc. in lat.
40. As explained in example 13 there is a further correction of 3' to be added which
gives the Asc. in lat. 39 :45 as 22 Libra 25.
As the Asc. on Map. D. is 22 Libra 25, and Mercury is 22 Sagittarius 23, the distance
aspect is from perfect (b) is 2'.
The Sun on Dec. 26, and therefore the M.C., is moving 61'. To find how far Asc.
moves while M.C. moves 61', as previously explained, multiply (a) 50 by (d) 61.
This gives 3050. Then divide by (c) 60, which gives the daily motion of the Asc. (b)
as 51'. The daily motion of Mercury on Jan. 26, 1920, is 1° 31'. The daily gain is thus
40'.
By proportion, multiplying (b) 2 by (c) 12 gives 24. Dividing 24 by (a) 40 gives (d)
24/40mo or 18d. By logarithms, subtracting log. (a) 1.5563 from log. (b) 2.8573
gives 1.3010 which is log. (d) 1h 12m. Dividing this 72m by 4 gives 18d. As Mercury
is moving faster than the Asc. the aspect is formed after the Map. D. Therefore the
18d must be added to Feb. 9, 1930. Progressed Mercury is sextile Asc. p, Feb. 27,
1930.
*Out of print, see Astrology: 30 Years Research